Two Hangouts You Don’t Want To Miss This Week!

June 26th, 2014 by Bryanna Davis

two hanguts 148188246Whether you just graduated, are planning to become an international student or are an international student- we know you will think one, or both of these hangouts is worth watching!

Today, Thursday 26th, at 10am EST International Student Loan is hosting a Google+ Hangout On Air to help explain some of the most confusing loan terms that students run across. International students in need of financial aid and who have considered a loan won’t want to miss this hangout! The hangout will explain some of the top terms you’ll come across when comparing and applying for a loan- terms that are important to understand before agreeing to a loan.

International Student is also hosting a Google+ Hangout On Air this week! The International Student Hangout will address how you can use your contacts to get a job. Whether you’re an international student who just graduated or who is about to start your first semester- these tips will be ones to take note of and keep in mind during your search for a job. Don’t miss this Hangout Friday June 27th at 11am EST.

Attend the International Student Loan Hangout to get student loan terms explained. Start watching today at 10am EST.

 

Attend the International Student Hangout to learn how to use your contacts to get a job. Watch Friday at 11am EST.

If you can’t attend the hangouts make sure to visit the International Student Loan video page and the International student Hangout page so you can watch both videos in your free time.


Applying for Off-Campus Employment: Writing a Follow-Up Letter

June 7th, 2014 by Jennifer Frankel

Man signing contract451613245While it may be standard knowledge to submit a resume when applying for a job, many international students may be less familiar with the tradition of sending a follow-up letter after an interview.

Many universities around the world are loosening restrictions that previously limited, if permitted at all, the amount of hours international students could work for an off-campus employer. In many places where international students were previously unable to seek off-campus employment, those students are now sending out resumes and applications to businesses in their new host countries—most for the first time. That being said, it is important to know what to write in a follow-up letter, as well as what not to write.

Elements of a Good Follow-Up Letter

A follow-up letter is an applicant’s chance to directly thank the interviewing hiring manager for taking their time to consider him or her, as well as an opportunity to refresh the manager’s memory regarding some more positive points of the interview and to reiterate how well he or she would fit with the company. However, a hastily or poorly written follow-up note can be a disservice, so keep the following points in mind:

  • Personalize it. Don’t send a generic ‘Thank You’ form letter. This letter is being written directly to the hiring manager who interviewed you, so reference something real in their lives when thanking them. Maybe they mentioned a project they are swamped with—thank them for taking the time to consider your application despite his or her workload with project XYZ.
  • Reiterate Your Value. During the interview there may have been a number of positive interpersonal moments, or instances where the hiring manager mentioned projects wherein you felt your skills would be valuable contributions—the follow-up letter is the place to mention them. Don’t just mention you “feel your qualifications are a match for the position”, show the hiring manager you mean business and know that specific skill x will be a great asset to the company’s project y.
  • Timeliness. Be prompt in sending your follow-up letter. It should ideally be received one or two days after the interview.

Writing a follow-up letter or thank you note to a hiring manager is unlikely to change the outcome of a poor interview. However, sending a follow-up letter can certainly tip the scales in an applicant’s favor and help distinguish them from a group of similarly qualified applicants. Moreover, not sending a follow-up letter can harm an applicant’s chances of success.

That being said, international students should be sure to include writing cover and follow-up letters among their application procedures for finding off-campus employment.